Eligibility Reguirements
.Eligibility Requirements
Must be in the rank of E-2 through E-8.
Must be a U.S. Citizen.
Must be eligible for a Top Secret security clearance.
Security Clearance. If your job requires you to have access to SECRET information, you would require to have a SECRET Security Clearance, etc. For military personnel, two things determine the level of security clearance required; your MOS/AFSC/Rating (Job), and your assignment. 
Many military jobs require access to classified information, regardless of where one is assigned. In other cases, the job itself may not require a Security Clearance, but the particular location or unit that the person is assigned to would require giving access to classified information and material.
For example, when I first enlisted into the Air Force into the Aircrew Life Support AFSC, the job required a SECRET clearance level. A few years later, however, I was considered for an assignment to a unit which required me to have a TOP SECRET clearance with SCI. Even before I knew I was being considered for the assignment, the Air Force initiated a TOP SECRET/SCI background check.
Almost everyday, someone sends me an e-mail, or posts a question on our message board concerning security clearances in the military. What is a security clearance? What do they look at? What can keep me from getting a security clearance? How far back to they investigate? How long is a security clearance valid?
What is a Security Clearance?
The military possesses information and technology which could be helpful to our enemies. The unauthorized release of this information can compromise our nation's national security. Unauthorized release can cause battles/wars to be lost, missions to be ineffective, and can result in the death or injury of military and civilian personnel. 
A security clearance investigation is an inquiry into an individual’s loyalty, character, trustworthiness and reliability to ensure that he or she is eligible for access to national security information. The investigation focuses on an individual’s character and conduct, emphasizing such factors as honesty, trustworthiness, reliability, financial responsibility, criminal activity, emotional stability, and other similar and pertinent areas. All investigations consist of checks of national records and credit checks; some investigations also include interviews with individuals who know the candidate for the clearance as well as the candidate himself/herself.
In the military, all classified information is divided into one of three categories:
CONFIDENTIAL: Applied to information or material the unauthorized disclosure of which could be reasonably expected to cause damage to the national security.
SECRET: Applied to information or material the unauthorized disclosure of which reasonably could be expected to cause serious damage to the national security.
TOP SECRET: Applied to information or material the unauthorized disclosure of which reasonably could be expected to cause exceptionally grave damage to the national security.
Must have one year time on station (waiverable).
Must have an ASVAB " GT Score " of 90 or above (waiverable). Those who have a GT score of less than 90 are encouraged to retake the ASVAB.
The ASVAB subtests for determining the composites are: General Science (GS), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Numerical Operations (NO), Coding Speed (CS), Auto and Shop Information (AS), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), Electronics Information (EI), and Sum of Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension, scaled (VE). 
Current aptitude area composites used for MOS selection for the Marine Corps are as follows: 
CL- Clerical, Administrative, Supply & Finance - NO + CS + VE (Note: CL Score was eliminated in late 2002. All job Marine Corps requirements that required a CL score were changed to GT Score at this time. The score requirements are the same. In other words, if a job previously required a CL score of 90, then it was changed to require a GT score of 90).
EL -Electronics Repair, Missile Repair, Electronics and Communications -GS+AR+MK+EI 
MM - Mechanical Maintenance, Construction, Utility and Chemical Maintenance (hazmat) - GS+AS+MK+MC
GT - General Technical, Special and Officer Programs - VE+AR 
The Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a series of tests developed by the Department of Defense in the 1960s. The battery has undergone changes over the years, but currently consists of nine individual timed subtests: Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), General Science (GS), Auto & Shop Information (AS), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), Electronics Information (EI), and Assembling Objects (AO). 
The military services use the ASVAB to determine your aptitude to complete military training and to determine which military jobs you may qualify for. High school guidance counselors use the ASVAB to help you decide which civilian occupations you may have an aptitude for.
The Army began general testing of draftees during World War I. In order to provide a means of classifying draftees, the Army developed the Army Alpha Test, which consisted of 212 multiple-choice and true/false questions on the following subjects: vocabulary, sentence structure, arithmetic problems, number series, general knowledge, and "common sense."
When it became apparent that many draftees could not read or write, and therefore could not be properly classified using the Army Alpha Test, the army developed the Army Beta Test, which minimized verbal knowledge and used only pictures and diagrams. 
During World War II, the Army replaced the Alpha & Beta Tests with the Army General Classification Test. This test consisted of 150 questions on the following topics: vocabulary, arithmetic problems, and block counting. More than 9 million recruits took this test during World War II. Interestingly, the tests showed that only 63 percent could read/write above a third grade level.
During this time, a completely separate aptitude test was being administered by the Navy (The Air Force was still part of the Army).
When Congress passed the Selective Service Act in 1948, they mandated that the Department of Defense develop a uniform screening test to be used by all of the services. In response, DOD developed the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). The test consisted of 100 multiple-choice questions in the following subjects: vocabulary, arithmetic, spatial relations, and mechanical ability. This test was given to recruits from 1950 to the mid 1970s. The separate tests were used to form a composite AFQT score, and each service was allowed to set their own minimum score standards.
In the 1960s, DOD decided to develop a standardized military selection & classification test, and administer it throughout U.S. High schools. ASVAB tests were first used in high schools in 1968, but it wasn't used for military recruiting until a few years later. In 1973, the draft ended and the nation entered the contemporary period in which all military recruits are volunteers. Three years later, in 1976, the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) was introduced as the official mental testing battery used by all services.
In December, 2002, DOD removed two subtests from the ASVAB, and included one new test. Removed were Numerical Operations (NO) and Coding Speed (CS). Added was a new test called "Assembling Objects."

In addition to the above, some classified information is so sensitive that even the extra protection measures applied to Top Secret information are not sufficient. This information is known as "Sensitive Compartmented Information" (SCI) or Special Access Programs (SAP), and one needs special "SCI Access" or SAP approval to be given access to this information.
"For Official Use Only" is not a security classification. It is used to protect information covered under the Privacy Act, and other sensitive data.
Who requires a Security Clearance?
Basically, anyone who requires access to classified information to perform their duties. If your job requires you to have access to CONFIDENTIAL information, you would require a CONFIDENTIAL Security Clearance. If your job requires you to have access to SECRET information, you would require to have a SECRET Security Clearance, etc. For military personnel, two things determine the level of security clearance required; your MOS/AFSC/Rating (Job), and your assignment. 
Many military jobs require access to classified information, regardless of where one is assigned. In other cases, the job itself may not require a Security Clearance, but the particular location or unit that the person is assigned to would require giving access to classified information and material.
For example, when I first enlisted into the Air Force into the Aircrew Life Support AFSC, the job required a SECRET clearance level. A few years later, however, I was considered for an assignment to a unit which required me to have a TOP SECRET clearance with SCI. Even before I knew I was being considered for the assignment, the Air Force initiated a TOP SECRET/SCI background check.

Must have no tattoos visible in uniform.
Must meet Marine Corps weight and fitness standards.
All Marines are required to maintain their weight/body fat in accordance with Marine Corps standards. Marines who weigh more than allowed on the charts linked below must undergo a body-fat measurement. Those who are over the Marine Corps body-fat standards are enrolled in the Marine Corps Body Composition Program - formerlly known as the "Weight Control Program."
Marine Corps Weight Chart -- Male
HeightMaximum WeightMinimum Weight
5813291
5913694
6014197
61146100
62150104
63155107
64160110
65165114
66170117
67176121
68181125
69186128
70192132
71197136
72203140
73208144
74214148
75220152
76226156
77232160
78238164
79244168
80250173

Marine Corps Weight Chart -- Female
HeightMaximum WeightMinimum Weight
5812091
5912494
6012897
61132100
62137104
63141107
64146110
65150114
66155117
67160121
68164125
69169128
70174132
71179136
72184140
73189144
74195148
75200152
76205156
77211160
78216164
79222168
80228173

Must have no record of Nonjudicial Punishment within the last year.
Marines in the rank of E-5 and below must be single, with no dependents. However, those Marines who have children but are not the primary care takers are not immediately disqualified (i.e. paying child support or alimony is not an immediate disqualifier). E-6s and above may have up to four dependants to include spouses. 
Upon selection, Marines attend the Security Guard School at Quantico, VA. The MSG school conducts five class sessions per year training more than 450 Marines. 
Upon graduation from MSG school, Marines in the rank of E-5 or below are assigned as standard security guards or "‘watch standers." These Marines then serve three separate year-long tours, one of which will likely be a hardship post in a third world country. 
Marines in the rank of E-6 and above are assigned as detachment commanders and are operationally responsible to the ambassador or appointed delegates. They serve two, 16-month tours and can bring dependants along. Each tour is served in one of nine regions. 
For more information, or to apply, see your Career Retention Specialist (CRS) and inform him/her that you are interested in becoming a Marine Security Guard. 
Note: Your command cannot deny your request to MSG duty. They simply make a recommendation. They still have to submit your package through your Career Retention Specialist. HQMC has the only say as to whether you will receive orders. If someone in your command refuses to let you submit a package, make sure you get it in writing, then contact the MSG Security Screening Team at: (703) 784 4861.




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